Issue #70 - October 2010

View The Highlights & Photographs From This Issue.

In this issue we look first at a device that was designed to speed up home production of yarn in the period just before the Industrial Revolution. Then we learn about two mid-19th-century wheel makers from Ohio. Two more makers of Canadian production wheels are presented.


Vertical Spinners for Home Use

After he acquired a vertical spinner, Michael Taylor researched these multiple-spindle devices invented to increase yarn production. In that transitional period of 1810 to 1840, several models were built and marketed. From period documents he discovered that some models worked better than others.

Vertical spinner
Vertical spinner

Two Ohio Spinning-Wheel Makers

Max Stebelton is a descendant of the Ohio wheel maker Jesse Stebelton and owns three spinning wheels made by him. He tells us about Jesse and other members of the family. He also discovered a spinning wheel by a contemporary of Jesse's, William Bodenheimer, who lived in a neighboring town.

Spinning wheel built by Jesse Stebelton
Spinning wheel built by Jesse Stebelton

Great wheel built by Jesse Stebelton
Great wheel built by Jesse Stebelton

Marks on great wheel
Marks on great wheel

Wheel built by William Bodenheimer
Wheel built by William Bodenheimer

Paradis Spinning Wheels From St. André

Continuing the survey of Canadian production wheels [CPW], Caroline Foty presents what she and the members of the Ravelry CPW forum have been able to learn about the Paradis family of spinning-wheel makers.

Paradis spinning wheel
Paradis spinning wheel

PARADIS mark
PARADIS mark

ARAM PARADIS mark
ARAM PARADIS mark

LUCIEN PARADIS mark
LUCIEN PARADIS mark

Characteristics of Paradis and Desjardins Spinning Wheels

Lorinda Chard discusses the characteristics of the spinning wheels marked Paradis and Desjardins.

Desjardins spinning wheel
Desjardins spinning wheel

DESJARDINS mark on wheel with cast iron treadle
DESJARDINS mark on wheel with cast iron treadle